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Reviews for I believe in the separation of Church and State  1-11 OF 11

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lmorovan (15)
04/25/2008
I believe in the separation of Church and State too. Get the state off the neck of the Church and let her be and do what she is. The Constitution guarantees the freedom of religion without the interference of the Government, and the Government must use all resources at its disposal to defend and protect this freedom. When religious freedom is violated by the State, the State is acting illegally.

The problem is not as much the separation of Church and State, the problem is discrimination by the State against the Church. Many believers are politicians, and many politicians are believers. Both the politician and the believer are human beings, with Constitutional rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution. A politician cannot be forced to leave his believes at home when going to work in the Government. And a believer cannot be forced to leave his/her political conviction before entering a Church. A believing politician has the right to freely express his/her beliefs and conviction without restriction or censorship, especially in the public places and ares which are the patrimony of all citizens, regardless of their religious convictions. Yet, a believer is prohibited to express any political views in a private area, namely the Church, where the state has no right to interfere or prohibit.

The obvious solution: no politician can be nominated for any office if he/she has any religious beliefs or affiliation, and no religious person must be allowed to serve in official positions. Looks like tyranny to me. And that is where we are heading with this Separation of Church and state nonsense.

  (2 voted this helpful, 3 funny and 1 agree)
fitman (45)
11/01/2007
True conservatives have no problem with keeping the government out of the religion business, but either very few real conservatives are to be found in the Republican Party these days or the GOP leadership has decided they must pander to fundamentalist, Dominionist extremists

http://www.yuricareport.com/Dominionism/DirectoryRiseOfDominionismInAmerica.html

http://www.yuricareport.com/Dominionism/DirectoryRiseOfDominionismInAmerica.html

BTW, American atheists are so marginalized, they - like the miniscule numbers of American leftists - really have little or no influence with either party.

  (2 voted this helpful, 1 funny and 0 agree)
SilverFox (27)
10/01/2007
It's an excellent idea, even if it didn't happen to be in the Constitution. The Constitution (as interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court) mandates government neutrality toward religion. See my review of the subject here. This protects us from each other, like all of our rights under the Constitution, and most liberals favor Constitutional rights. But is this truly an idea typically associated only with liberals? Surely there must be conservatives out there who believe it's a good idea, though obviously not the evangelicals. Let's hear from some conservatives on this (but not on whether the Constitution separates church and state--that argument belongs with the reviews here).

  (3 voted this helpful, 0 funny and 0 agree)
MariusQelDroma (35)
09/30/2007
The separation is a total misnomer and misread of the First Ammendment, as numbah colorfully explained. All the amendment says is that the government can't play favorites and promote one religion over another, and that it can't stop people from practicing their religion or lack thereof. Quite simple, but enough people want to argue about it...

  (4 voted this helpful, 0 funny and 1 agree)
Vudija (94)
09/29/2007
I understand the concept of it, but it's rather hard to actually remove the influence of the Church from such things.

As much as I would wish for that to happen, I know better. The views of the Church have shaped our culture, our opinions to certain things. If the majority of people agree with the church than the views of the Church have their voice in government.

And, as far as numbah's comment goes: I would have to agree. People tend to have 6 million definitions of this and approach it in a manner that best serves their own purpose. I don't see how prayer in school hurts anyone as long as no one is forced to participate, I don't see how commandments can't be placed outside buildings, or why people give a crap who displays a Christmas tree and a scene of baby Jesus on their lawns. People are too uptight for their own well-being about things they could simply overlook if they don't care for such things.

On a side-note. As far as this list is concerned, I never claimed these ideas were strictly left. As I pointed out elsewhere, ideas change, have multiple meanings and can fall into several categories. This particular one is here because it has to do with personal freedoms which tend to be a major factor in why a person might lean one way or the other.

  (2 voted this helpful, 0 funny and 1 agree)
XAgent (28)
09/29/2007
I think both sides kind of like this amendment but most forget their history lessons from third grade about it, even tho they teach it again in high school American history and Government class.

  (5 voted this helpful, 0 funny and 0 agree)
numbah16tdhaha (152)
09/29/2007
Well, I don't lean left at all and that is surely well known, but I think this concept is one of the most overargued points that people have their nose out of joint about because alot of people on the left can't really define it right. I actually had somebody tell me "we should ban those Christian groups from campus," leading me to specify to that loon that such an act violates the First Amendment. I was then called a "religious right nutjob" who "doesn't understand d*** about the constitution since it clearly calls for separation of church and state!" I then explained the establishment clause of the First Amendment in great gory detail and asked if that person would like their religious freedoms supressed. The loon then told me he was an atheist so "those idiots don't matter" and I knew everything I needed to know. This guy was all about his rights and didn't give a crap about anybody else's, and you know kids, that's not how the Constitution is built. Of course when I told him that I became a "knuckle dragging neanderthal who lives in the past," but do I really care? Nah...

  (6 voted this helpful, 0 funny and 0 agree)
CanadaSucks (48)
09/29/2007
Real or imagined 'leftism' has nothing to do with it- you separate theological dogma from law because (in historical terms) it leads to the decline of personal freedoms on the average. . .it's just an intelligent perspective, not 'left'. . .

  (4 voted this helpful, 0 funny and 0 agree)
Loerke (49)
09/29/2007
Liberalism always turns on the idea of a separation between public and private spheres. That's always been one of the best contributions of liberals like John Stuart Mill and others. Communists and Christian fundamentalists refuse to protect the wall between church and state. So, yes, liberals definitely believe in this.

  (6 voted this helpful, 0 funny and 0 agree)
louiethe20th (75)
09/29/2007
I believe in The Separation of Church and State's original meaning, but not the new version.

  (3 voted this helpful, 0 funny and 0 agree)
oscargamblesfro (80)
09/28/2007
I don't believe that one necessarily has to 'lean left' to believe this- strict Constitutionalists, liberal Republicans, and many others would agree with it too. As for having a society comprised of multiple perspectives and belief systems over a theocracy, well of course... Unless someone has a truly whacked out belief system on the level of a dangerous cult or something, I don't see the problem with their believing what they want to. I don't like people who think that their beliefs, regardless of what they are, should be followed by all. I tend to lean left, but I don't see how this view is the province simply of left- leaners... I agree- for the most part- with a great essay that Tom Paine wrote about all of this...

  (6 voted this helpful, 0 funny and 0 agree)
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