RalphTheWonderLlama
member since 05/03/2010
User Votes: 21 Helpful / 14 Funny / 17 Agree / 76 Disagree
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Activity for RalphTheWonderLlama

355 days ago

Nah, git, I never forget it. Of course, I'm always sober, unlike you: the alcoholic with self-esteem issues.

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357 days ago

Two hundred years ago today occurred one of the epic battles of the 19th century, or of any century for that matter: the Battle of Borodino. It was the last hurrah and a Pyrrhic victory for the greatest army ever seen up to that time. It led to the defeat of Napoleon's Grande Armée, and the vacuum of power in continental Europe in which Germany would later fill, shaping the events of the 20th century. Its impact is still felt today.

Napoleon, pissed that Russian Czar Alexander I had reneged on the continental blockade of Britain, crossed the Nieman River in late June of 1812 with nearly 600,000 troops. Advancing on Moscow, the Russian army retreated after a series of defeats, most notably at Smolensk. The Russian commander Kutuzov (who had replaced Barclay) finally made a stand at a little hamlet named Borodino, about one hundred miles west of Moscow.
The battle began early in the morning and lasted most of the day. Although the French won the field, they did not destroy the Russian army. The losses were staggering; over 70,000 troops were lost in one day (compare that to the bloodiest single day in the Civil War 50 years later; the Battle of Antietam, where the losses were only 1/3 of those at Borodino). The problem was that French losses could not be made up, while the Russian losses could be replaced, and the Russian army got away to fight another day...
Aftermath...
With the Russian army out of the way, Napoleon entered Moscow a week later only to find it devoid of people and supplies. Napoleon waited over a month for a Russian surrender that never came, and when it finally dawned on him that he was totally screwed, his army was deep in hostile country without supplies or food, and little hope of getting any, and the impressive Russian winter coming on. Napoleon retreated, but the Russian army he failed to destroy at Borodino kept to the south, forcing Napoleon to use the same route he entered Russia with, a route long stripped of food and supplies by the armies a few months earlier. The remnants of the army, a pitiful 22,000 or so, finally limped out of Russian territory on Dec. 14th, 1812. Napoleon was finished.

The battle inspired Leo Tolstoy to write a book called War and Peace, and it also inspired Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky to compose a little ditty to commemorate the Battle of Borodino:

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360 days ago

Looks like the banks are preparing for Greece to bail on the Euro. Do they know something we don't?
Read about it HERE.

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360 days ago

Um, frankscurlyyears, exactly what is the point of your baiting me? You seem to be a master at that...

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363 days ago

Don't they have one of these in Albuquerque?

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364 days ago

The lady doth protest too much, methinks.
Hamlet, Act 3, scene 2, line 254

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364 days ago

UPDATE: You left out the most important verse, as usual:
The sum of the matter, when all has been considered: Fear God and keep His commandments, for that is man's whole duty. For God will judge every deed—even everything hidden—whether good or evil.
Kohelet 12:13–14
So, instead of your worthless Epicurean fantasies, you should do what is important.


Why on earth do we need such distractions in the first place? Exactly what good do they do for us? Did not the Spartans love games, for it trained their young little fudgepackers to better appreciate war, the ultimate sport? Exactly how can you compare a Mozart concerto with some big lug lumbering through the mud with an inflated dead pig? Yet what is our focus in our public schools? Do you really think we spend as money on things such as art and music as we do on "sports"??? I fail to see the logic of paying people millions of dollars to play some stupid game...

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364 days ago

I don't care if he did coach the A's for fifty years; I wouldn't vote for him.

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364 days ago

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364 days ago

Not nearly as important as a man being 80 proof more than the female, as the listmaker should well know.

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By the Numbers